During my school days, I was reluctant to participate in many of the activities offered. However, I was elected to be the proposer in a debate entitled, “Travel Broadens the Mind and Stimulates the Intellect.”

Having just returned from a trip to Amsterdam, and being forced to endure certain unplanned experiences, I am thinking that there may be more to travel than postulated in the title of this debating topic.

Amsterdam via Istanbul

Last week, I was travelling with my daughter Daniella who has given me permission to blog about this recent episode in our life. In order to save about R1000, we decided to take the route to Amsterdam on Turkish Airlines via Istanbul, instead of taking the direct flight offered by KLM.

We arrived at Istanbul at about 11 pm with our scheduled connecting flight listed as being three hours later. I knew that Dubai was a massive airport, but was surprised to find the distance between disembarking from the plane and the transit lounge at Istanbul was also a considerable distance.

As we had been sitting on the plane for about 11 hours, I decided not to take the escalators when walking up and down the stairs. After all, I had been sitting and needed the exercise. So, by the time we arrived at the transit lounge, I was really tired and very surprised to see there was limited seating. Most of that was already occupied.

After some searching, I found a spot to sit and rest until I felt it was time to move to the gate from which the next stage of our trip would leave. I looked around to find my daughter. She was nowhere to be seen. “Well,” I thought, “She is an able-bodied, sound of mind middle-aged women, with her own passport, her own seating ticket, and her own luggage. She must have made her way to catch the next flight.” I presumed she had spent the time looking at the shops and made her own way to the following stage of the journey.

The Unexpected and Unanticipated Reality

When I arrived at the relevant gate, I was mildly surprised to find that passengers had already started to enter the plane. There was no sign of Daniella. I was looking forward to seeing her when I arrived at my seat. But the place was empty.

Some mild anxiety started to arise in my mind and my body. I went to find out from the cabin crew when the plane would be leaving. “In about 25 minutes,” was the answer.

You do get one hour of free wi-fi at Istanbul airport, but I had not been successful in applying the code and achieving connectivity, so I asked the cabin steward if I could use his phone. He was most obliging, and I could feel my heart pumping as the phone was ringing, and I was awaiting a response from my offspring. But there was no answer.

“Could they make an announcement?” I asked the steward. That was out of the question. What could be done? Was I to fly off to Amsterdam without my daughter? I had heard of a young woman who had been offered drugs in that part of the world and had never returned home. Was I to lose my progeny in the Middle East due to my negligence? “Should I be looking after my daughter? Or, should she be looking after her octogenarian mother?” I asked myself.

And as I went back to my seat, the adjacent passengers started asking me questions. I felt humiliated in having to admit I had lost my daughter. Maybe they thought I was totally irresponsible. Or maybe they thought she was totally stupid. Which is better? Which is worse?

And then the doors started to close. The plane began to taxi. Here was an empty seat, and no daughter. I had to gather together all my theoretical knowledge on how to cope with this trauma. I was grateful for my practice of mindfulness and set about turning into my feelings while meditating. Realising that there was absolutely nothing I could do in the present situation, I concentrated on calming myself down.

I Arrive Alone in Amsterdam

On arrival in Amsterdam, I was relieved to find a WhatsApp message from my son who lives in this beautiful city. He had received a phone call from Daniella. Yes, she had missed the flight! He had booked her on the following flight. She would be arriving in a couple of hours.

This information was vaguely reassuring. Now I needed to find Daniella’s luggage. I waited and waited for it to appear, but it did not arrive. In fact, it only arrived the next day. But worse was to come!

Because she did not turn up for the flight from Istanbul to Amsterdam, Daniella’s return flight was automatically cancelled. She booked and paid for an alternative return flight via Nairobi. On her return, her flight leaving Amsterdam was delayed. She missed her connection to Cape Town and spent 5 hours as a guest of Kenya Airways in Nairobi, thus missing a day of work when she arrived home.

The Bonus

Travel does indeed broaden the mind, and it does teach you lessons on how to look after yourself at the same time!

 

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