I am so excited that you decided to take on the challenge of learning your Parasha and preparing a lesson about Jewish customs and beliefs, on the occasion of your Barmitzvah.    Your parents can encourage you to participate in a Jewish ritual which goes back many centuries, but only you can make the choice of committing yourself to the work that is involved.

I have spent many hours contemplating the reason why Judaism has retained the enthusiasm of intelligent and talented boys like yourself.   You could be playing soccer, or making music with your drum, or sailing a yacht or playing computer games with your pals.   You have decided to dedicate your time to learning about a people who have beliefs, stories and customs which have allowed them to achieve great things.    Jews have excelled in the arts, in science and in the humanities, and you have demonstrated the potential to further enhance the contribution of our people.

I was brought up during the time of the Second World War.   Every Jewish boy who lives in Amsterdam must know the story of Anne Frank.  You have some concepts regarding the horrors of the Holocaust.   What a talented, perceptive record has been left by Anne Frank of the undignified challenges faced by European Jews during the time of World War 2.    I mention this because the difficulties of being Jewish during the third and fourth decades of the 20th century resulted in my father deciding that it was a disadvantage to be a Jew.

So, when I came to South Africa from England the age of nine years, I was sent to an Anglican School and given the false identity of a Unitarian.    My father felt that this approach to forming a religious identity would make my entrance to this school more acceptable than if I had attended as a Jewish girl.   I grew up with a very confused idea about who I was.   As I had no family in this country I was unable to ask anyone what it meant to be Jewish.

I am going to make a very bold and provocative statement now!  Had I continued on the pathway set for me by my father, you would probably not have been born.   Your father would have grown up with no idea of his religious background.   He would never have met your mother.   And, this is the reason that I am particularly happy that you have been brought up as a proud young Jewish man.    Your family and your friends all support you in developing your chosen lifestyle.    I am so proud and happy to share this occasion with you.

You are able to identify with your own people from an early age.   It was only after I married and had children that I learned about my heritage.   I was in my 30’s when I first enrolled in a course of Jewish history at the correspondence University of South Africa.   I waited until I was in my 40’s until I decided to study Hebrew.    The effort I have made in those later years to research the background of my ancestors has enriched my life immeasurably.   I am so happy you have had the chance to pursue this knowledge from a younger age.

Your mother was born in Israel.    Do you ever wonder how this tiny country which fits into the Kruger National Park of South Africa has managed to develop a thriving economy and contribute rich technological advances to allow people all over the world to live fuller and more comfortable lifestyles?   How lucky are we as Jewish people living in the 21st century to enjoy a proud history of achievement.   Now, in modern times our brethren are at the forefront of developing technological and medical knowledge in the interests of forging a richer and fuller lifestyle.

You are brought up in an environment which offers you the opportunity to be bilingual.   In addition you are studying the language of Hebrew.  I personally envy your ability to speak two great European; languages, both Dutch and English, with fluency and flair.

You are indeed fortunate.    You have a wonderful Great Aunt Bella who lives in Haifa who you have visited regularly.    You have grandparents who live in South Africa with whom you have annual contact.  A loving extended family of cousins who live in Cape Town.    Your parents who have given you the security of a loving and stable home.  We have confidence you will make your mark as a contributor to humanity by living a full life whilst enhancing the lifestyle of those who may not be as fortunate as yourself.

Noam, I am very proud of you, and I have the confidence to predict that you have a great future ahead.   You are destined to make a valuable and meaningful contribution to humanity.

With Love and Best Wishes

Granny Grace.

 

“Education should not only train people to solve problems and sharpen their intelligence but, more importantly, to be good human beings.” ~ Matthieu Ricard

#10

Chatting to a friend yesterday, I was surprised to hear from her an evaluation of her grandson’s education. “He is a brilliant student and recently qualified as an accountant,” she said. “But, when I spoke about #10, he did not know what I was talking about. And to make matters worse, “she added, “he has never even heard of Downing Street. I really do not understand what education today is all about!”  She reflected on her own background in the arts and her fund of general knowledge. I could not help thinking, “Is this really what is important in this day and age? Does a lack of a piece of factual knowledge give us the permission to condemn the contemporary system of education?”

I managed to refrain myself from vocalising my thoughts. I acted sympathetically. While not agreeing with her statement, I did manage to stop myself from disagreeing. However, more importantly, I started to ponder the primary requirements of contemporary education.

My Thoughts on Contemporary Education

Ken Robinson on TED

The first place to which my mind travelled was to the TED talk given by Ken Robinson which is one of the most popular of all time.   It has achieved  62 164 165 viewings. the main point of Robinson’s presentation was the enormous value of training in creativity, rather than the presence of a vast factual knowledge base.

Scenario Planners advocate Thinking Skills

In a recent blog, I have spoken about the work done by the scenario planners Chantelle Illusbury and Clem   They have put a great deal of work into developing a system which encourages the students to practice their logical thinking skills.

Understanding our own Biases

Another recent blog of mine talks about the work that Johnathan Haidt is doing on American campuses to enhance the students thinking of racial, class and gender issues. He focuses on giving the learner the skills to become aware of their own unconscious biases.

Evolution of Goals of Education

The next thought that came to my mind was, “Is it appropriate for us ladies, who were born more than 80 years ago, to use the educational models of our growing years as an example for the present generation?” Seventy years of history has been added to the available information since our school days. To say there has been an information explosion is an understatement. What percentage of the school curriculum should be devoted to technology? Our teachers did not have to worry about finding space in the curriculum for computer usage when I was a scholar.

Contemporary Goals in Education

At the stage, I decided it was time to do some research and bring ‘Mr Google’ into the act. My query in the search engine was, “What are the Education Goals of Today?  Here is what I found in the first article I accessed.  While this is an arbitrary choice, It is sufficiently broad in scope and progressive in orientation for me to use as a starting point.

The School Around Us suggests the following as education goals:

  • Learn how to learn, for life by being aware of multiple resources
  • Discover the whole self by reflection and introspection
  • Exploring and practising basic skills by understanding the interaction of all things
  • Practice responsible and knowledgeable citizenship

I rather like how The School Around Us reflects on the spiritual aspect of Holistic Education. “It is not a traditional school, in that the “basics” include matters of the spirit, the body, the heart, as well as the mind. Academics are certainly important, but they are only part of the “basics”.

Current Events Meeting promotes Further Ideas

At our U3A current events meeting this week in September 2019 the facilitator opened with a challenge. “Why do you think,” he enquired, “the British politicians are having such a hard time getting together making a decision.   The British Parliament has so many well educated and experienced politicians, yet they seem unable to form an agreement on this matter despite being led by three different Prime Ministers in the past three years?”

I did recognise our leader was being intentionally provocative. My thoughts were, “These experienced British Politicians may be well educated, but that does not mean they are necessarily rational in their behaviour. Each of us has our biases which may well not be founded on logical thought.”

Coda

While going to do my shopping this morning, I was stopped at a pedestrian crossing by a school teacher who was ushering her primary school class to cross the road. She failed to share my greeting, offered while I patiently waited for the last child to cross the street. As she moved on, I was anticipating a friendly wave or some acknowledgement for my wait. I was disappointed. She merely walked on with never a gesture of appreciation. I wonder what sort of education she experienced! And, I wonder if she knows where 10 Downing Street is situated!

 

A serendipitous viewing of this fascinating debate between Jonathan Sachs and Jonathan Haidt led me to pursue the evolving change in communication habits which influence our contemporary value systems.  The subject addressed by the two eloquent debaters examined the The Moral Dilemmas Created by Today’s Social Media.

Electronic Media

“Electronic media has not only linked us to many more people it has divorced verbal communication from human presence,” said Rabbi Sachs.   He went on to reference the anthropological work of Bronowski who did research with the Trobriand Islanders at the beginning of the 20th century.   His observation drew attention to the profound fact that islanders’ communication was more about bonding than the exchange of information.   An acute reminder of the change of emphasis found within today’s society often billed as the Information Age.

Tablet Magazine

Soon after watching this discussion, my inbox received further information from Tablet Magazine of Haidt’s work.   When listening to his discussion with Rabbi Sachs, I had assumed he was a moral philosopher.   However, I was soon to learn that he is not only an academic Social Psychologist but is very actively promoting the introspection of changing social norms which he considers a danger to western liberal thought.

I was fascinated to learn about the work he is doing on American University Campuses.   These are the very space which should be a bastion of free speech.  However, they very often become a place where visitors who promote unwelcome ideas are not allowed to express their views.

Asteroid Club

Have you heard of an Asteroid Club? Whether it is a friend with whom you have a clash of values, a co-worker who views life from a different perspective or a friend with a dissimilar viewpoint, membership of this club will guide you on how to go about creating a safe space for a positive discussion.   Meetings under the auspices of the Asteroid Club are conducted with specific guide lines.   The aim is to enrich one’s resources and perspectives on current controversial subjects be they politics, religion or sexual orientation.

Certain guidelines have been suggested to assist the discussion when people with varying outlooks engage in dialogue.   Members are made aware of the evolutionary predisposition of humanity to form groups of like minded people.   Contributors are made aware that the aim of the discussion is not to convert others to their side, but rather to widen their knowledge of different points of view

While this social experiment would start with a core group of 8 – 10 people who represent different viewpoints, as the group develops the numbers of participants may grow.   The discussants are encouraged to provide food and drink as a lubricant for social interactions.   So if you believe that civic discourse should be more open than it is today, you can form your own Asteroids Club!

Heterodox Academy

Another practical initiative initiated by Jonathan Haidt, is his Heterodox Academy which is a collaborative of more than 2500 professors, administrators and graduate students who are committed to promoting open inquiry, viewpoint diversity and constructive disagreement in institutions of higher learning.

It is felt that in many fields of research, important question and ideas may be overlooked because of the traditional perspective of that particular institution.   The academics who participate in the Heterodox Academy are attempting to regain the traditional open debate, which ideally should take place in any institution of higher learning.

Freedom of Expression

Many students on American university campuses complain today that they are frightened to make their voices heard, thus undermining the most essential raison d’etre of this learning establishment.   Even administrators and staff are censored regarding the views they can express.  The retention of viewpoint diversity needs to be strictly guarded at all institutions of higher learning

OpenMind

OpenMind is a psychology-based educational platform designed to depolarize campuses, companies, organizations, and communities. With this initiative, Haidt and his colleagues foster intellectual humility and mutual understanding.   At the same time, students are equipped with the essential cognitive skills to strengthen their ability to engage constructively across differences.

Concluding Thoughts

I have a strong belief that in everyday life the mutual exchange of opinions acts as an essential check on our own personal growth, ensuring we do not become entrenched in outmoded beliefs despite the changes taking place in the world around us.  We are helped to see things from the standpoint of the other, thus widening our vision.

An invitation

Do follow some of the links I have offered in this post, and let me know if you would like to be part of my forthcoming research community for Open Minded Seniors!

 

 

 

I spontaneously made a statement during our recent monthly Conscious Ageing Meeting.   This impulsive articulation of an inspirational hunch has resulted in my delving into a profound journey of research and meditation.   My suggestion.   At our next monthly meeting, we will feature the concept of Multiculturalism as a focal point for discussion.

Multiculturalism Defined

Multiculturalism can be defined as the doctrine that several different cultures (rather than one national culture) can coexist peacefully and equitably side by side in the same country

My motivation

My motivation for this topic was based on my semi-conscious feelings around the contemporary changing attitudes to the integration of different cultural and ethnic groups into mainstream society.   This hunch has verified by subsequent enquiry.    The concept seems to have become mainstream in the news of the past week.

Concerns world wide

Evidence from all over the world – be it the Americas, or Europe, or Africa or Australia; demonstrates controversy over the acculturation of immigrant groups. Should they be encouraged to foster their own unique identity, or should they be expected to integrate into the dominant culture of the country of their birth; the land of their adoption?

Israel

The first contribution to my thinking resulted from a report I received from a good friend in Israel, an experienced teacher of English as a foreign language in the south of the country.   It is in this region around the Negev Desert that the majority of Bedouin Arabs live.   I learned that during their primary and high school education, the Bedouins and Jewish populations in Israel go to schools devoted solely to their population group.   It is when they enter the stage of their tertiary education that Israeli Jews and Israeli Arabs meet socially for the first time.  This new situation brings with it the challenges of adapting to people with a wide variety of social norms and cultural values.

South Africa

This knowledge led me to think about the educational system in South Africa. In the days of apartheid, there were schools for people of African Descent, of Mixed Race, and Asian parentage.   White children attended their schools devoted to their population group.   During the past 20 years, since the dismantling of the former political dispensation, schools in this country have become racially integrated.   While there have been some incidences of racism reported in schools during the transition; considering the rapidity of change, the new system is working amazingly well.

And, in my family

I am privileged to have an adopted Zulu grand-daughter who attends a multi-cultural Montessori school which enrols children from the total range of ethnic backgrounds resident in Cape Town.   This includes children of African parentage, Coloured children, Asian kids, young persons of mixed race and a sprinkling of Caucasians.   When I arrive to fetch my grand-daughter, I am greeted with the words, “Hallo Mishka’s granny.”   I find this salutation most appropriate!

Multicultural Song writer

Johnny Clegg died this week at the age of 66.   He was a great musician of Jewish descent who blended western music with that of the Zulus.   Johnny spent much of his childhood in the company of Zulu children and was enchanted by their music, dance and rhythm.

He was a dancer, anthropologist, singer, songwriter, academic, and activist.   Even these accolades fall short of describing the energetic, passionate man who had become one of South Africa’s greatest musical exports.   He acted as a cultural ambassador for South Africa by combining western and Zulu tradition in his well know band Jaluka.   Listen to his music here

End of Apartheid

The end of Apartheid in South Africa coincided with my entry into a franchise business which allowed me to engage in teaching computer skills to children.   It was a great source of satisfaction to me, and a novelty at the time, that I could market our educational opportunities to all population groups.   Some of our best customers were children who would have been prohibited from utilising our services a few years previously.

Putting it all together!

Whilst ideologically the concept of a multicultural society appeals to me, it seems that there are many problems when immigrants are allowed to maintain the customs of their motherland.  From the wearing of different apparel, the practice of different cultural norms and the adherence to different value systems; there may be many conflicts of interest.

A high-profile historian Geoffrey Blainey first achieved mainstream recognition for the anti-multiculturalist cause when he wrote that Multiculturalism threatened to transform Australia into a “cluster of tribes”.  He criticised Multiculturalism for tending to “emphasise the rights of ethnic minorities at the expense of the majority of Australians”.

Major News Story

At the present moment, we have President Trump continuously in the news regarding his policies on the Mexican border.   He has been suggesting the four Democratic women who are criticising his policies should, “Go back to your own country, and fix the crime infested places from which you came.”  This is even though three of them were born in America, and the fourth is a naturalised citizen.

These comments have led to a tremendous backlash with views on slavery, the holocaust and other historical forms of exclusion are emerging to the forefront of political discourse.

What do you think?

If you do not favour Multiculturalism, does that mean you are a racist?   It seems to me that some balance needs to be found between retaining one’s personal identity, and adopting the customs of the major cultural group in our country of residence.

Your thoughts would be welcome in the Comments section of this blog post.

 

 

Intelligence Squared is considered the world’s leading forum for online debate and intelligent discussion.  This medium recently staged a lively discussion around the role that Facebook plays in influencing public opinion.    Two contriubtors spoke in favour of the motion “Is Facebook Damaging Society” and two people spoke against the it.

Let’s think about this topic

How much thought have you given to the role that Facebook is playing in influencing society today?   My belief is that the results of recent elections has demonstrated the powerful role played by this social medium in influencing public opinion

Writing in July 2019 my hunch is that the election of  Donald Trump as well as the Brexit vote, both of which took place in 2016, were heavily influenced by information gleaned from Facebook accounts.    Potential swing voters were identified by an analysis of personal information accumulated by a custom built app.   The information gleaned was passed on to those with the capacity to target the relevant individuals, thus influencing their voting behaviour.

The Good and the not so Good

Having just listened to this online debate hosted by Intelligence Squared I have become even more aware of the potential of Facebook’s power for both good and evil.   How do we control this monolith so that its capacity to educate, to stimulate business growth and to connect people can be encouraged?   Whilst malevolent information gathering can be controlled.    Some measures need to be established to prevent data accumulated from Facebook profiles being used to manipulate public opinion for the nefarious ends of malign forces.

Following Trump’s Election

The enquires necessitated by the election of the Trump presidency has established the need for some serious monitoring systems to guide the use of personal data.  Some changes have already been implemented.   Many thousands of employees have been taken on by Facebook to monitor every contribution made minute by minute on its site.   Enormous teams have been assembled to peruse every new post in a multiplicity of the world’s languages.   A team of 30 000 employees are checking every fresh contribution made on the Facebook site to ensure it obeys the implementation of new rules.  Mark Zuckerberg has been receptive to the backlash of public opinion and has agreed to play a major role in monitoring all postings.

Is an Ethical Code Possible?

I am asking myself whether it is possible to determine an ethical code around monitoring the 2.2 billion users of Facebook.    How can we possibly delineate criteria for judging items of potential erosion of values, or provocative interpretations?    Is it possible to find an ethics committee to agree on the criteria for what is and what is not moral and ethical?

The power of Facebook

Have you ever ruminated on the power and responsibilities of Mark Zuckerberg?  In the entire history of mankind, has there ever been an individual as powerful as this man?    The Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire, and the Kings of Colonial Constituencies were not able to spread information, garner opinions and influence the masses of people in the powerful manner in which Facebook can manipulate its followers today.

There are more Facebook users than there are Christians living in the World.   In fact in some sectors of society the term Facebook is used as a synonym for the Internet.

A Monitoring Board has been proposed

It seems that Zuckerberg and his Facebook acolytes have been made aware that a monitoring system is essential if public faith in their product is to be maintained.     Suggestions around creating a new board of 40 members to adjudicate published information has been mooted.   This board has been likened to the Supreme Court of Justice

Whether or not this analogy is realistic is doubtful.   The Supreme Court monitors the behaviour of 364 million people living in the USA.   Facebook will have to oversee the data of 2.2 billion people living in countries all around the world.

Positive Research Potential

There is a potential for scientific progress in the understanding of human motivation offered by the rich sets of data recorded by Facebook.  The masses of personal information collected could be a force for some exciting new types of research into human behaviour.   There is a growing body of research from a wide range of different disciplines like psychology, sociology and social anthropology which are now deriving useful information from social networks.  The potential of this wide range of opportunities is yet to be evaluated, but the prospect of enriching our understanding of human behaviour is exciting.   Data is a powerful new tool for the development of specialised scientific concepts within the field of the Social Sciences.

Let us hope that the tremendous potential of modern scientific techniques can be utilised for the betterment of society, rather than the blind manipulation of Facebook users.

To listen to the debate you can go here

 

 

“If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” — Dalai Lama

I like to keep up to date with current developments in mindfulness, meditation and Buddhism. This results in my contact with varying interpretations on the benefits of living a lifestyle which includes compassion for self, for the other, for animals and the environment.

Karen Armstrong

However, it was Karen Armstrong who first drew my attention to the power of this personal quality.  Her interest in compassion arose from her own struggle with religious belief.  When she lost her faith in the Catholicism in which she was raised, she was motivated to study a wide range of different religions.  This led to her understanding of the main role played by compassion in all the different faiths; those of both the East and the West.

Promoting her ideas on TED

In 2007 she drew the attention of a broad audience to the benefits the practice of compassion can bring to the individual when incorporated into our lifestyle.   With a beautifully articulated TED talk,   she created an awareness of how compassion needs to be learned to enhance our wellbeing.  “Compassion doesn’t mean feeling sorry for people. It doesn’t mean pity. It means putting yourself in the position of the other, learning about the other. Learning what’s motivating the other,” she said.

In 2008 that she was awarded the annual TED prize for promoting the importance of developing a compassionate lifestyle.    She believed in a worldwide movement towards minimising war if the benefits of compassion could be learned and practised by a sufficient number of people.  https://www.ted.com/talks/karen_armstrong_makes_her_ted_prize_wish_the_charter_for_compassion?language=en

Charter for Compassion

Karen worked with an international panel on a Charter for Compassion, which came out in 2012.  It opens with these words: “The principle of compassion lies at the heart of all religious, ethical and spiritual traditions, calling us always to treat all others as we wish to be treated ourselves.   Compassion impels us to work tirelessly to alleviate the suffering of our fellow creatures, to dethrone ourselves from the centre of our world and put another there, and to honour the inviolable sanctity of every single human being, treating everybody without exception, with absolute justice, equity and respect…………………”

Matthieu Ricard

It was Matthieu Ricard who trained as an engineer and later became a Monk who first drew scientific attention to the neurological changes taking place in our brain when we have developed our capacity for compassion.   It was about 25 years ago when he was the first person to be placed in an MRI machine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to meditate on compassion.   What the scientists observed was profound.   The needle measuring the activity of the delta waves of the unconscious mind jumped off the graph paper.   Due to his thousands of hours of meditation, Ricard had control over parts of his brain that are normally unconscious. You can listen to him here: https://www.ted.com/talks/matthieu_ricard_how_to_let_altruism_be_your_guide

Meditation and Compassion

The psychoanalytic model divides the mind into the Conscious, the Unconscious, and the Subconscious.   With the long term practice of meditation, you can gain access to both the unconscious and the subconscious mind, which helps you to have greater control of your emotions.  This is what makes the study of the theory and practice of Meditation and Mindfulness so worthwhile.   I put myself through a two-year University Diploma Course on the theory and practice of mindfulness as for the past six years have developed a daily early morning meditation practice.   I do believe that this regular routine has allowed me to maintain my emotional responses at equilibrium and not overreact to stress and the inevitable receiving of bad news.

Self-Compassion

Christine Neff, who is the leader in promoting the capacity to look after ourselves, says very wisely, “Compassion for others isn’t sustainable without compassion for self.  Self-compassion involves “being with” ourselves in a compassionate way, as we naturally do for our friends who struggle.   It also involves protecting and motivating ourselves.   Saying “no” to others who are hurting us, drawing our boundaries firmly, as well as giving ourselves what we need to be fulfilled mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually.

Holocaust Compassion

I recently attended a presentation by Arthur Shostak.   He is an American sociologist and futurist, and former professor of sociology. The last few years he has been travelling around the world to promote the concept of “Holocaust Compassion”; a very different concept to “Holocaust Fatigue” when people become overburdened with the suffering of this period regrettable period of horrific events during World War 2.     Shostak has made a study of people who risked their lives during the Holocaust to save the life of others.

Guards who were threatened with death if they spoke to the new arrivals, would at the times of the selection process whisper instructions to them in an effort to save their life.   People younger than 15 or older than 40, would automatically be sent to their death at the gas chambers.  The guards would whisper this information to the assembled victims allowing those individuals just short of the lower age limit, or just above the upper one to claim on age between 16 and 39!

Compassion and You

If you have not considered learning the art and theory of Mindfulness and Meditation, it is a study which I heartedly recommend. Indeed, it will develop your capacity for compassion for both yourself and for other people.

And, if you wish to share your compassion stories, that would be great as well.   That is what the comments session on this blog is all about.

 

 

 

 

Wisdom

If you look at the Merriam-Wester dictionary, you will find the word Wisdom defined as:  “The ability to discern inner qualities and relationships.”    Somehow, I have the feeling that there is more to Wisdom than described here, so I decided to make this concept the theme for this month’s meeting on Conscious Ageing.

The six participants were offered the opportunity to discuss in pairs what they understand by the term Wisdom, to make some notes, and then bring their ideas back to the group.   And, here is some of the feedback which emerged!

As it materialised, there was a considerable amount of conformity in their findings.   Wisdom, the participants concluded was found in a fair number of personal qualities.    Such characteristics as having an open mind, being non-judgemental, having gratitude for what one has, accepting responsibility for one’s relationships, being a good listener, as well as possessing both humility and tolerance, were all part of the wisdom concept.

Participants felt that it is vital to have respect for the views of others.   This respectfulness did not necessarily require agreement but demanded an openness and a tolerance for ideas differing from their own.

Populism

The lack of tolerance for views of others has become a critical part of the current political discourse.   A semi-retired professor of Political Philosophy, Leonard Suransky, is offering our local University of the Third Age a course on the rise of Populism, a movement which is evident on both the left and on the right.  These extreme views result from feelings of insecurity and a lack of respect for the ideas of the other.

Many political analysts view Donald Trump as the arch-Populist at this time.  America is followed by many European countries for the emergence of Populist leaders, while in South Africa we have the Economic Freedom Front on the Left being led by Julius Malema and the extreme Right-wing Freedom Front Plus party at the other end of the spectrum.

Tribalism

Professor Robert Wright, who is a visiting professor of science and religion at Union Theological Seminary in New York, has teamed up with Tricycle Magazine to run an online course on Tribalism.   The concepts of Tribalism and Populism have much in common, and Wright with his interest in Psychology, Buddhism and Politics is teaching his ideas of how to neutralise present extremism with an understanding of Evolutionary Psychology, Mindfulness and Meditation.   The course has just started, and I recommend you have a look at it here:  https://learn.tricycle.org/?utm_source=trikehdr&_ga=2.140385459.1430994263.1558263600-1994547164.1558263600

My personal belief is that Wisdom has a great deal in common with both Conscious Ageing and Sageing.   Both of these world-views have been introduced into the lexicon of ideas during the past couple of decades.   An era in which there has been a growing backlash against Ageism – the view which promotes the idea that the greater your chronological age, the more dependent you become on society. Another feature of Ageism is the belief that after a specific arbitrarily defined birth date, you are not capable of learning new material.

One of my motivations for running groups on Conscious Ageing is to encourage people that you can maintain your capacity to learn new ideas and new concepts until the day you die.   To accept this outlook may well be considered part of Wisdom and encouraged me to share with the participants two new concepts I learned while surfing the internet this past weekend.

Mansplaining and Digital Dementia

Mansplaining defines the attitude of a male when he describes condescendingly to his female acquaintance, the meaning of a word, a statement or an idea.   I believe this is a  useful addition to my vocabulary and I am just waiting for an opportunity to say to a man, “You know; you are ‘mansplaining’ me, and I take offence to your attitude!”

Digital Dementia is a scary contemporary diagnosis for the situation when a child loses his capacity for emotional control, or whose cognitive abilities are prejudiced because of an overexposure to the screen or the different devices available in today’s environment.   The increase in the number of children with both behavioural problems and learning disabilities is profound. Parents need to be educated in ways in which they can limit their children’s screen time, as a deterrent to having the developing brain’s neurone development of their growing offspring’s retarded. It is essential that children have plenty of physical activity for developing neurons to be adequately stimulated.    Static time, staring at a screen should be limited, and the amount of time recommended will depend on the age and the needs of the child.

Sageing

I believe that Sageing is an integral part of both Wisdom and Conscious Ageing.   Sageing International   www.sage-ing.org   has grown from a seed planted by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi in 2004.    It promotes some concrete activities around creating a vibrant and flourishing senior lifestyle; as well as training leaders to connect with others through programs such as Wisdom Circles.

Let’s hear your ideas

Anybody who has read this article, reached the end, and has interest in further pursuing the concepts of Wisdom, Sageing, or Conscious Ageing can contact me through the comment section on my website, And; I look forward to hearing from you!